Skip to main content

About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
CSPAN2 5
CNNW 4
KQED (PBS) 3
WHUT (Howard University Television) 3
CNBC 2
CSPAN 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
KQEH (PBS) 2
KTVU (FOX) 2
CNN 1
FBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 44
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
news coverage in the civil rights movement that featured jack quite prominently. first i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this and cosponsoring this and also emory university which houses the papers and the wisdom of a great journalists and we are so pleased that the to the surprise winners and the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was generous and made jack's papers our possession now and there is some rich history and i encourage everyone to go and take a look at them. we are here to celebrate the life, memoir, peepers of jack nelson with some people that knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence and consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson for those that don't know is the story of news reporting and of the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at his career, she was born in alabama just across the state line and moves to biloxi where he starts prattling newspapers. he was a newspaper boy, an honorable way to begin. it's how i got my start. [laughter] he gets his first job at the daily herald, an afternoon newspaper
news coverage of the civil-rights movement, featured jack quite prominently. first of all, i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this one and for cosponsoring it and also the emory university libraries, particularly the manuscript archives and rare books librarian which houses and in the papers and the wisdom of a great number of seven journalists. white, african-american, all sorts -- we are so pleased that five of those opulence a prizewinners'. the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was so generous and has made jackson papers our position now. there is a rich, rich history, and ensure it -- encourage everyone to take a look. we are here to celebrate the life and more, the papers of jack nelson with some people who knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence in consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson, for those who don't know, the story of news reporting and the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at this career starting off -- he was born in telling the of just across the state line to moves as a child to bil
conversation with a civil rights icon in her own right, coretta scott king. back in 2005, we traveled to atlanta for a very special program with miss king at the famed ebenezer baptist church, the church that was home base for dr. king during much of the civil rights movement. a conversation which would turn out to be one of her last on national television. we're glad you could join us to wrap up this 10th anniversary week with a conversation with coretta scott king, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we kick off our second season in 2005, we could think of no better way to celebrate than by paying a visit to coretta scott king at atlanta's iconic e
, making mentions of past civil rights struggles on that martin luther king day, seneca falls, selma, stonewall and laying out his vision for the future, advancing gay rights, tolerance toward illegal immigrants, social welfare programs and stopping climate change. dan loathian was there watching it all with us. dan, friend and foe alike have been calling this a muscular speech. >> reporter: it really was according to those who got a chance to witness the speech. the president delivering his remarks in a much more different climate than he faced four years ago when you had two wars, there was the economic crisis. this time, the president laid out a progressive agenda for the next four years. and so it began, the second inaugural ceremony of president obama, part campaign speech, part lecture, a confident president obama appeared comfortable in his skin. >> my fellow americans, we're made for this moment and we'll seize it as long as we seize it together. we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal >> our journey is not complete unti
for everybody. he also talked about the civil rights movement. i think the idea behind this of s of basic equality and opportunity. our country is founded on those principles. when he talked about immigration today, again, it was opportunity and equality and he's going to fight for that just as he had his entire career he's going to do that for the next four years. his hope-- as we had the national day of service yesterday sds that ordinary americans get involved. get engaged with their country whether through volunteerism, whether through letting their voices be heard as we try to pursue legislation in washington it's a spirit of for engagement and that was a big part of what the president was saying today. we don't have to solve all of our problems but let's not put the short-term political interests ahead of the american people. >> schieffer: ms. jarrett, it's bob schieffer here. i wanted to ask you, because you do know the president so well. republicans i keep hearing say, well, they think the president doesn't like them. they say he doesn't like politics. that he doesn't like to get
in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on the supreme court. she will be delivering the oath of office to the vice president. this is beyonce coming in now and we will be hearing from her. there are several musical performances today. after the vice president is sworn in, james taylor will be singing "america the beautiful." then following that, john roberts, jr., the chief justice of the united states will administer the oath of office to the president. we just saw 88-year-old jimmy carter arriving on the scene. former presidents are almost always in attendance at these events, but today, george herbert walker bush and his son, george w. bush are not in attendance. the elder mr. bush has recently been released from a month-long stay in the hospital due to a respiratory ailment and so both bush families announced that they would not be able to attend because of the poor health of the eld
on civil rights, but we can be right -- we can be first on human rights. instead of being laughed, we want to be first at something, and we believe being first ending abortion is a good thing. >> 3 hours drive from jackson, you have reached the mississippi delta. in one of the poorest parts of america, choosing to have an abortion is not an option for many women. they cannot afford to pay for the procedure. >> she is 13 years old. last month, she gave birth to her daughter. >> it is hard to go to school. i'm very sleepy. >> [indiscernible] >> gin at ground level has been working with pregnant teenagers in the delta and for 17 years. she is worried that the jackson clinic closes, more of these weylandt will have an unwanted pregnancies. -- more of these women will have unwanted pregnancies. >> [indiscernible] >> hsu became a mother two years ago when she had her daughter. now out of work, she is struggling with her decision not to become a mother again. >> i know this is something i have to do. i have to do this for me. >> bbc news, mississippi. >> the restriction of abortion rights 40 year
are allowed, and civil rights attorneys will say that happens, that's allowed all over the country. what bratton did in new york was a much more aggressive form of that. there was -- in heavy crime areas, drug market, open-air drug market areas. you had a very intensive use of stop and frisk. and it had -- there was a -- now, those drug market areas in new york were heavily impacted. now, whether they could have been impacted without stop and frisk is an open question. sociologists say. so, but bratton and other police advocates would say it was instrumental, but, again, that's an open question whether it was, how necessary that was. >> now, how much interaction will bratton have with the community? because at the city council this week, there was heated public testimony for hours with people opposed to having him in the city of oakland and bringing his policies here. how effective can he be if the community doesn't support him? >> it's an interesting question. originally, he was going to be leading the town hall forums where he would be interacting with the community and recognizing the
's the critical part of it, right? when they dig in with their civil lawsuit they unearth more stuff as we found out today in the morgan stanley case. why didn't the government dig in? and let me pause at a theory for you and get your reaction to it. one, these guys give a tremendous amount of money to politicians. dick durban said frankly they own the place and he's the second more senior senator for the democrats in the senate. and they're all in the same circle. attorney general eric holder doesn't think waaaa i'm going to do deals that's my friend bob. i just represented him the other day. i'm not going to put bob in jail. >> there are a lot of political appointees. here eric holder and then lanny brewer chief of the criminal division of justice the man who sits at the crux of all this. there are a lot of justice attorneys who would love nothing more than to bring down a major banger, a major wall street player put a notch on their belt. that's a counter veiling to reality. you say without support from above it's hard for them to act and i think that's very likely true. on the other hand i t
thurman whom hated the civil rights bill so much, mr. dixiecrt that he stood tup on the floor of the senate for 24 hours and 18 minutes before he had to pee and filibuster ended and they voted. but that was the filibuster. now, it's come into something that happens all the time, that is routine that one senate can do to block a measure from coming up a vote. first, they have a vote of whether or not they are going to proceed to a vote. you can filibuster that. you can filibuster the main event, and you don't have to do a filibuster. all you have to say is: i am filibustering this and sit in your office and watch t.v. and nothing happens. it is outrageous. it is undemocratic. it's the tierney of the minority. we talked about this for so long with senators who were determined that not just this term, but last term term before, but this term for sure with democrats having 55 votes, there is no reason why they couldn't fix it. and if i canning it meant either getting rid of the filibuster or making people actually filibuster or roll in cots so the
, they waited for their civil rights leader, senator henry marsh to leave town to vote on the gerrymander calling bill. getting comments on beyonce. bashrbara says she is gorgeous and talented. her voice inspires. leave her alone. >> bill: no. >> find us on twitter @bp show. >> i am disappointed. congressman, tuesday morning, yesterday morning, i was gushing all over what a phenomenal job beyonce did. >> don't tell me james taylor -- i thought he sounded awful good for his age. great voice. >> he did. >> he was live. >> right? >> thank god. >> did you recommends she was lip synching? i was looking at her. >> you saw the front. do you meet in a phone booth? >> the largest in congress bigger than the united states senate. >> no kidding. >> yeah. >> get everybody to go to meet in washed. >> they are being progressive >>>. >> like herding cats. you can't do it. >> so what impact do you feel you can have on this congress given john boehner and the tea party couldn't get anything done? >> politics in lining up votes and taking positions is all pressure. it'
functioning of our -- of our country. i mention in particular the long, long struggle for civil rights and how that was held up by a small minority which happened to be in my party, by the way, at that time. but nonetheless, the senate through the years has really been the chamber that takes a long and hard look at legislation, where we have the right to amend, where we have the right to discuss and to embark upon discourse on legislation in a manner that allows even the smallest state, the smallest state to be able to be represented as much as a large state. not true in the body that both the occupant of the chair and i used to serve in in the house because there, as you know, large states can dominate because they have got most of the members. but here, the senator from connecticut is just as important as a senator from california or a senator from iowa, or, let's see, what's the least popular state, wyoming, i think, maybe or alaska is equal to a senator from new york or florida or texas or cal. so this has been the great equalizing body. and so having served here for this time, i think i h
of the civil rights act and the voting changes that occurred then. but since then, we've heard no mention of the right to vote in this country being a protected right and the sanctity of that idea. i think the only thing -- first of all, we gotta remember, we vote every two years in this country. not every four. that needs to be the refrain from -- every time you talk about an election, anybody within the sound of my voice needs to -- when they talk about voting or any of those things or what's going to happen in the next election, you're not talking about 2016. you're talking about 2014. those often matter more so because that's when they sneak these folks through. that's when purple districts turn red because people are look the other way or are too busy. thanks for the call. appreciate it. we'll be back right after this. more of "the stephanie miller show". celebrating her mom's 90th birthday. >> she'll be back tomorrow though. >> she will. >> i'm sorry. that's inappropriate. >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." desmond tutu said a quote that is one of my favorite quotes. "w
in the first layperson to deliver an inaugural invocation. she is the widow of medgar evers, the civil-rights activist who was assassinated 50 years ago. >> 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit of our ancestors, which has allowed us to move from a nation of unborn hopes and history of disenfranchised folks to today's expiration of a more perfect union the a-expression of a more perfect union. we ask that where our paths seem blanketed by oppression and rippled by pangs of despair, we ask for your guidance toward the light of deliverance. and hose who came before us and dreamed of this day, that we recognize that their visions still inspire us. they are a great cloud of witnesses, unseen by the naked eye, but all around us, thankful that they're living was not in vain. for every mountain, you gave us the strength to climb, your grace is pleaded to continue that climb for america and the world. >> myrlie evers delivering the inaugural invocation. o misled, president of emmett if his inaugural address. >> week, the peop
of the naacp, widow of slain civil rights leader edgar medgar evers 50 years ago this year. >> america, we are here, our nation's capital, on this day, january 21st, 2013, the inauguration of our 45th president, barack obama, we come at this time to ask blessings upon our leaders, the president, vice president, members of congress, all elected and appointed officials of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon our armed forces; blessings upon all who contribute to the essence of the american spirit, the american dream, the opportunity to become whatever our mankind, womankind allows us to be. this is the promise of america as we sing the words of belief, this is my country, let us act upon the meaning that everyone is included. may the inherent dignity and inalienable rights of every woman, man, boy and girl be honored. may all your people, especially the least of these, flourish in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit of our ancestors which has allowed us to move from a
couldn't happen. civil rights, womens rights, don't ask don't tell, sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. change will happen when we work for it as a country. >> this will not work or make a difference. >> what will make a difference? >> prosecute guys that commit crimes. >> a minister asked the crowd to pray in the direction of the white house to wish the obama administration success in passing tighter gun control laws. >> tens of thousands of protestors took to the streets of san francisco for the anniversary of legalizing abortion. pro-life protestors marched down market street from the civic center to justin herman plaza demanding roe v wade be turned over. a law student who testified before congress about contraception was a guest speaker. >> there is a more profound sight about access. about affordability and insurance coverage and making sure people especially in rural areas have access. >> i would like to see everyone question abortion more. they say it should be legal and safe they don't talk about rare. >> as many as 40,000 people attended the pro-life rally. it's the biggest a
. and then the third element was his expansion of civil rights where he talked about immigrants and gays and even shoehorned gun rights under the rubric of the security. he outlined the liberal agenda, the big-government agenda of the future. >>gretchen: i think there were two words that came out of it that summarized what charles was saying was that the president yesterday used these two words: collective action. if you parse those two words, it could bring you back to how he started in his career as a community organizer. >>steve: bob schieffer from cbs said there were no memorable lines in this speech. i think what is memorable is what his political director at cbs said in offering advice in a "slate" magazine column to the president. go for the throat of the g.o.p. listen. >> this article should scare anybody who has any doubts whatsoever about the media's impartiality. he is the news director, political director -- excuse me -- for cbs news. he writes a piece in which he calls for essentially an antidemocratic action. depoliticize the g.o.p. action. he believes obama at to delegitimize. it
an awful lot and passionately, and rightfully so, about rights, about civil rights. he didn't talk at all about civic responsibilities. and the thing i remember best about kennedy's speech is ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country. that's one of the things really missing in our country now and it's gone away over the last 15 years. we're trying to have democracy without citizenship. >> also had a chance to talk vermont senator bernie sanders at the american legions inaugural ball. he's the longest-serving independent in congressional history. he's also chair of the senate veterans affairs committee and he's talking about how concerned he is there are cuts to social program will hurt the military and families. i asked how does he plan to work with republicans to bring him closer to his side. >> i think republicans will be getting -- are beginning to catch on. they're beginning to understand the american people do not think that it makes sense to cut back on programs like social security, medicare, medicaid, veterans' needs and say, oh, yeah, we shoul
this is a civil rights issue of now, of today, and we need to make it the civil rights issue and really talk about what's involved, the lives that are involved. >> and i just want to make it clear, you're anti-abortion rights, that's right? >> that's correct, yes. >> just to follow-up to that first question about why the poll numbers have risen and the number of people who support abortion rights. during the election, as you know, todd akin, richard mourdock, two men running for federal office said some unwise things perhaps about race and abortion. do you think that kind of hurt your cause? >> oh, i'm sure it did, and we had -- those clips were run over and over and over and over again and there's no way that that did not affect public opinion. it's unfortunate. i think both of those candidates have very good pro life voting records. what they said was simply unfortunate. they clearly did not know how to communicate what it is that they believe and why they believe it and i think that it became a huge liability for them costing them both of their races. >> now the other side would say, you know,
in the civil rights movement has died. vern nonnathaniel dobson. in the early 1960's, reverend dobson committed his life to social justice and equality. he was a major figure in the faith community for four decades. we got a chance to speak to 96-year-old anne miller who worked with reverend dobson to start the maryland food bank. we asked her what she remembers about him. >> he did something. he didn't just wring his hands and say, it's terrible. he knew something could be done about it, and he did it. >> mayor stephanie rawlings-blake said we must give thanks to reverend dobson for his honesty and perseverance in the face of racism and cruelty. another released a statement saying i am proud to call him friend and his death is a loss for anyone who cares about equal for all. >> and gun rights supporters are finding ways to demonstrate their passions over the gun control issue. more from washington. >> thousands of demonstrators joined a quiet march through the streets of washington to send a message to washington about gun violence. among those in attendance, about 100 parents from newtown,
and malcolm x were certainly huge and symbolic leaders of the civil rights movement. they were not friendly in life. but their two widows forged an intensely deep friendship. and i don't think a lot of people know that. >> right. i didn't know, either. that's what drew me to the story. the fact that they were friends. and they look at the bigger picture to, you know, live out their husbands' legacies to keep the dream alive, so to speak. and they didn't fight. they just -- >> because martin was peaceful to gandhi. and malcolm x., fiery. you know, by any means necessary. so, you know, whatever public was attracted to, you had y you sides you could go to. but they lived beyond that. >> exactly. the two women actually forged a really deep and intimate bond, not the least of which, they were both widows. they both lost their husbands violently. >> they had that deeply in common. they had families to raise. they were committed to the movement, and to the community, and to the struggle, i think to the larger issues. so, they were to get past it what was considered petty. >> single mothers. raised
jean quan said that threatens work in loss angeles has been advocating for civil rights groups and local committees. >> the manhunt for the suspects involved in a shooting of an undercover officer in oakland is over. police have in custody five men are believed to have gained ties. >> the shooting happened monday night between seminary in harmon ave. police say, the officer was working as part of a new violence reduction crying team and was alone when he was confronted and shot by several suspects. >> the officer is now at home recovering from his injuries. >> sexual assault allegations against 49ers star wide receiver michael crabtree do not appear to be holding up under investigation. >> investigators say there were looking into a complaint that crabtree had assaulted a woman at a hotel party after the 49ers defeated the green bay packers in a playoff game earlier this month. >> however, witnesses tell investigators that crabtree did not assault anyone and police have not found any physical evidence of the attack. >> crabtree has been denied any wrongdoing and has been cooper
. housing, they are discriminated against. a lot is almost a civil rights issue. it is a human rights issue. i am hoping integration helps that. families are torn apart by it. i am fortunate to have had a very fortunate family. the stress and strain economically will bust up families. you are right on it. think -- thank you for your acknowledgement. >> i think it is interesting families would not hesitate to get a family matter cannot -- family member help for appendicitis or any other problem but often have a difficult time reaching out to get the behavioral health and the substance seized disorder treatment they need. the bottom line is it is often seen that you have a character problem or a bad mom or dad or something along those lines, rather than, for many people, if they have a brain disease. there is a lot of education still to come and a lot of support we need at several levels for people to be able to move forward and raise their hand and come out and get help. i can also say we need to stick our head up and be proud of the fact that the area of health care we provide care in and w
engagement is the essential in protecting our citizens from harm, against civil-rights violations and combating guns, gangss and drugs through violence that steel too many promising futures. you understand exactly what it is that we are up against not only because you hear the alarming statistics in news stories but because you see it firsthand on a daily basis. most importantly you recognize as i do -- all right? most importantly you recognize as i do that no public safety challenge can be understood in isolation and none of us can make the progress we need and secure the result our communities deserve on our own. that is particularly true about gun violence, an issue that in one way or another has touched every city and every count represented here and about which many of you have been passionate advocates. on a number of occasions the leaders in this room have joined with those of us in the justice department who support what enforcement and strengthen anti violence initiatives especially in recent years as our nation has come together in the wake of last month's horse events i
. when you take away people's civil rights or say no to them you're not with them. if you're in a country club of 100 white men and they start dying off, your base is dead. the republican party, michael is right. he tried to do that when he was the chairman. you have to expand your base. only way to do that is to get out of people's houses, to get out of their bed rooms. to leave them alone. and have basically a society which is fair and equitable. don't forget mitt romney talked about the 47%. that is not the way to go about it. they have to look for it. >> last thing you hear, michael. you and i have had these conversations your relationship with the rnc. republican and out there fighting for what you believe in do you see this as i mean for the first time in awhile maybe a good chance and maybe just the drumming in the election with the president winning re-election. do you think republicans are starting? are you seeing signs that maybe it's hopeful in your opinion they're starting to change some of those stances and things you pushed and fought for? this is a hopeful thing for a repub
system. labor organizations, civil rights groups called for action, including those young immigrants who are willing but unable to enter the military. >> they let me know you're undocumented. you can't register. >> he's willing to fight and die for the united states of america. there's just one problem. the arizona resident does not have legal documents to live in the country. >> if you believe in something and you're willing to die for it, that's all it comes down to. >> reporter: as an immigrant brought to this country by his parents when he was 4, the 19-year-old callfies for what is known as deferred action. president obama's policy allows some young immigrants who meet age, education, criminal background requirements to stay in the country temporarily without fear of deportation, but it does not allow them to serve in the armed forces, which is something that arizona resident maria diaz, is also trying to do. >> would you be willing to join the military yourself? and if you aren't, then why would you turn down somebody who is willing to die for a nation that it's all they have known
. he equated the struggle for gay rights with the struggle for civil rights. >> our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. >> reporter: at the luncheon which followed a more bipartisan tone. speaker of the house john boehner presented the president with a gift and good wish. >> in the spirit of harmony i'm proud to present the flag that flew over this battalion of democracy today to president barack obama and vice president joe biden, and to you gentlemen i say, congratulations, and godspeed. >> reporter: the most poignant picture of the day was this the president going inside from the west front of the capitol, pausing and turning for one last look down the vast expanse of the national mall. another thing he thought he might not see, some daylight on the debt limit fight. republicans said monday they would vote tomorrow to raise the debt limit for three months that delays at least for a while another showdown on the debt which could result in closing down the government. and in just three
like school choice, which i think is the civil rights issue of the next generation, but you know, school choice, what it's fundamentally about is bringing competition to improve public schools and providing hope and opportunity for kids that are trapped and being denied a fair shot at the american dream. whether it's something like social security, personal accounts, which as much as republicans love to put on our green eyeshades and talk about solvency, far more important is the ability of those at the bottom of the economic ladder to accumulate resources and assets that they can use to pass on to their kids and grandkids to buy a home, to start a business, to get an education. whether it is taxed did, taxes and regulation. let me give a perfect example. one of the best slogans that came out of this last campaign was "you built that." and it was in response to barack obama's terrible but revealing comment, "you didn't built about -- build that, you didn't build that small business. "that was one of the best moments of the last campaign. but i wish we'd taken a different tack on
is a case of uncertainty at best. outright chaos at worst. outside of the civil war in syria the main concern right now is north africa. libya, algeria where we had the recent hostage taking and deaths of americans. mali where the french are fighting islamist extremists. according to professor burns, this sort of instability could go on for a very long time. >> it may be we don't see the future map of the middle east. it doesn't reveal itself for another 10 or 20 years. this this is so deeply rooted. >> chaos possibly for many years to come. the one thing we know for sure is that terrorists and extremists love chaos. >> that's true. jonathan, thank you. well, online dating doesn't always work out. the woman who says match.com, matched her with a man who stabbed her 10 times and kicked her in the head. mary k. beckman is her name. she is now suing match.com for $10 million. because she says it fails to warn users that online dating can be dangerous. ha! >> mary k. says she met this man wade wiley on match.com in may of 2010. months after she broke up with him he stabbed her 10 times wi
rights and environment. that's a huge take away. the third particular away his lecturing about the need for civility. and that's after the nastyiest race in politics. the media didn't point that out. stuart: this fawning acceptance of everything the president had to say yesterday, the media is the not pointing out financial peril. this is a financial program, you know that. we follow the money. if i follow the money trail down the road and we need to pay for the entitlements and spending and taxation coming at us, we have a slow economy, and a dangerous escalation in our debt. and i don't think the media is doing its job because nobody is saying it. >> they were too busy gushing, that's the problem. al roker frantically waving from the sidelines and wolf blitzer frantically trying to get his attention. this isn't reporting, serious journalism or a look at the issues of the day. they were attacking george bush for the cost of his inaugural before the inauguration, they were attacking him. there's no serious coverage of this man. the media are his absolute pompon wavers in this administra
's rights around the world, engaging with civil society, and restoring and maintaining american influence at a very difficult era. and i would have thought that your last drink would be your chance to give us some advice for what to do over the next, over the next four years and beyond. i take seriously your very strong advice, because i happen to agree with it, that it's about time we passed an operation bill through both houses of congress. but instead we're here, i guess our third hearing, to deal with the tragic events in benghazi because it is a chance for each political party to beat up on the other. we can talk about how republicans didn't provide you with resources. we can talk about the administration inside the state department. so i would hope that maybe we are did you to come back again. i realized that would be gratis. you wouldn't be on the government payroll at that time, and do the hearing that i would like to have, which is getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the secured of our diplomats depends on the host country. this is all a discussi
controls. i mean, that's a deliberate circumvention, right? >> it certainly sounds like it. and it certainly sounds like a good place to start a criminal investigation. >> in fact, according to a civil suit filed by the securities and exchange commission, countrywide's chief executive officer, angelo mozilo, knew as early as 2006 that a significant percentage of its subprime borrowers were engaged in mortgage fraud and that it hid this and other negative information about the quality of its loans from investors. when the case was settled out of court, the s.e.c.'s director of enforcement, robert khuzami, called mozilo "a corporate executive who deliberately disregarded his duty to investors by concealing what he saw from inside the executive suite-- a looming disaster in which countrywide was buckling under the weight of increasing risky mortgage underwriting, mounting defaults and delinquencies, and a deteriorating business model." mozilo, who admitted no wrongdoing, accepted a lifetime ban from ever serving as an officer or director of a publicly traded company, and agree
gutted. this is just a shell right here. this should be burning until about noon today. the fire broke out in this 44,000-square foot building at around 2:30 yesterday afternoon. it happened inside a civil engineering squad building, it is a two-story facility. when the fire started, theres with one person working inside this building. he made it out safely. fire officials say had it not been a holiday, there have would have been 200 people inside. one firefighter was treated for minor injuries. officials say this is a very big loss for beale air force base. this is one of the largest. >> two-story building like this housing approximately 200 people. so it sa big loss. but -- so it is a big loss. we'll recover from this and come back stronger. >> reporter: at this point, 200 workers have been displaced by this fire. we're told that a cause is still under investigation. fire investigators won't know until the fire is out that they have to wait until it cools off to go into the building. back to you, tori. >> 7:41 is the time right now. a dozen cars stolen from an east bay dealership. >>
is the gay struggle, the lgbt struggle for equality is it the next civil rights movement. he linked those two together. then of course moving on and mentioning marriage equality for all americans. a position he came to just several months ago. really really powerful stuff. >> bill: huge reaction from the crowd. the president talked about climate change. didn't do much about it. talked about it when he was running in 2008. didn't do much about it in his first term. but he spent more time, more sentences talking about it. about climate change than any other single issue. do we have that? >> obama: we will respond to the threat of climate change. knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. [ cheers & applause ] >> bill: the president also in one of those sentences took it back to the bible and said we have a god-given mandate to -- which we do in genesis one and genesis 3 to preserve our planet and take care of our planet. >> it really sounded like he was trying to split off the republican coalition. get the practical republicans some of the evangelicals w
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)